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In the early morning hours of April 29, 1903, a massive section of limestone broke away from the summit of Turtle Mountain in Alberta, Canada, and crashed into the valley below where approximately 600 people were sleeping in the community of Frank. The bustling coal mining town was founded just two years earlier, and was located at the base of Turtle Mountain. In less than 100 seconds, the rockslide obliterated the eastern section of the town killing close to a hundred people. The dimensions of the rock mass that fell was staggering — it was a kilometer long, nearly half a kilometer wide and 150 meters deep. It weighed an estimated 90 million tons. Because of the massive weight and depth of the rubble, no attempt was made to recover the bodies which still remain buried under 45 meters of rock.

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Tourists get their pictures taken among the huge boulders at Frank, Canada. About 80 bodies are still buried under these rocks. Photo credit: Peter/Flickr

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© Amusing Planet, 2015.





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