Register | Login


There was a time in Great Britain when having windows in homes and buildings were prohibitively expensive.

That time began in 1696 with the introduction of the much-despised window tax, that levied tax on property owners based on the number of windows or window-like openings the property had. The details of the tax kept changing with time, but the basic premise was that the more windows the house had, the more tax the owner had to pay.

In the eyes of the legislature the window tax was a brilliant way to put the burden of tax on the shoulder of the upper class. The rich usually had larger houses with more windows, and so were liable to pay more taxes. Poor people, on the other hand, lived in smaller houses and so paid less. To make the system even more attractive to the poorer class, those houses with fewer than ten windows were exempted from the window tax altogether.

window-tax-3

A building with bricked up windows in Bath. Photo credit: Jo Folkes/Flickr

Read more »
© Amusing Planet, 2018.


Loading...

The Extraterrestrial Highway, Nevada
The Extraterrestrial Highway, Nevada
The Titanic Museum in Branson
The Titanic Museum in Branson
Sky Bike at Mashpi Lodge in Quito, Ecuador
Sky Bike at Mashpi Lodge in Quito, Ecuador
Zona del Silencio: The Urban Legend of The Zone of Silence
Zona del Silencio: The Urban Legend of The Zone of Silence
Eenmaal: The Restaurant For Single Diners
Eenmaal: The Restaurant For Single Diners
History Most Iconic Photos Recreated in Miniature
History Most Iconic Photos Recreated in Miniature
The Horseshoe Shaped Asbyrgi Canyon
The Horseshoe Shaped Asbyrgi Canyon
Aerial View of Hang Son Doong: The worlds largest cave
Aerial View of Hang Son Doong: The worlds largest cave